0
0

We’re experimenting with using two ParamEQ effects on a car engine sound to create the "on load / off load" effect. This would reduce the sample memory required by the car samples as you’d only need the "on load" WAVs. The off load effect would be created by EQing some frequencies out of the sound.

However, it got a little fiddly. The ParamEQ’s "Center freq" parameter isn’t based on Hz, it’s a float. I tried to find the 1.2kHz area by ear, and it’s somewhere around the value 0.05 or 0.06 or so. It seems that the most useable bands (like 40 Hz, 400 Hz, 1200Hz, etc) are all in the very bottom end of the value range (how low Hz in general can ParamEQ handle?). Since only two digits are allowed for the float and you can only adjust it with the slider, it gets kind of tricky… but maybe our programmer can work around that.

Is there anything that could be done to make this easier? Even just a table that tells which Center Frequency value corresponds to which frequency in Hz would help.

  • You must to post comments
0
0

Hi Peter,

You’re totally correct, the parameter’s button text shows a value from 0.0 to 1.0, which corresponds to a linear frequency scale of 20Hz to 22kHz. This large frequency range does make it tricky to home in on the right values at low frequencies, so we’re in the process of making some adjustments.

We have recently been converting some of the filters’ controls to conventional scaling (i.e. logarithmic for frequency, ), and ParamEQ’s frequency will be done shortly.

In the meantime, a way to see directly the parameter you’re adjusting, is to drag the point on the envelope with the mouse. Some text will pop up to show you the value in Hz. You can also get more resolution by using the ‘z’ key while dragging the envelope point, which makes the parameter 10 times less sensitive to mouse movement. You can also increase the height of the layer to increase the resolution – it can be made shorter later on after you’ve done the adjustments and the envelope will be unaffected.

I hope this helps you.

  • You must to post comments
0
0

Thanks for the tips! They already helped a lot. :)

  • You must to post comments
0
0

Hi Peter Hajba,

How’s it going mate?

This is a bit unrelated to your question, sorry…

The EQing of onloads for offloads can work, but it does lack true deceleration character. If anything I’m adding more load layers: on/steady/offload :)

But if memory is an issue, it could be better to have 2 or 3 onloads and 2 offloads. Or any combination for that matter, as FMOD allows the flexibility. If an engine has a distinct offload character in the higher RPM you could EQ the onlows and add one real offhigh. I think this is really worth doing.

Other tips: Keep your low to mid RPM loops really short. Pitch the samples up a bit higher so they are shorter – but not too much as they sound muddy when down-pitched.

If the lower RPM samples are fleeting, and not heard that much, and the high RPMs are playing most of the time, then make the lower RPM sounds even smaller and maybe even a lower sample rate.

Cheers,

Greg

  • You must to post comments
0
0

Heya Greg,

So you found me. Busted. 😳

Sorry it took me a while to reply. It took us a while to do it, but we now have a working EQ system doing the Onload/Offload effect. For the sake of quality, we decided to make it optional. You can either use EQ or a full onload/offload sample set. Best of both worlds. :)

I guess, with very choppy engine sounds EQ probably won’t work. It sounds best on engines that have a very steady, monotonous sound.

  • You must to post comments
Showing 4 results
Your Answer

Please first to submit.