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Okay, first of all I am a beginner at acoustics theory and FMOD, so my questions may perhaps seem ‘dumb’. Sorry for that… oh yeah, and please excuse my poor English as well ๐Ÿ˜›

I am about to develop an application where the goal is to simulate sound propagation in a 3d landscape in a realistic way. I will use different mathematical models to calculate the sound pressure level at different locations, and control the final volume on different sounds according to these models.
But the volume of the sound is not the only thing that needs to be realistic. Basically I am wondering if FMOD has a good support for things such as sound occlusions (know there is an example of this, but would you say it is realistic?), doppler effect (once again, realistic?), other phenomenas that alter the frequency or character of the sound in some way.
I noticed a topic (http://52.88.2.202/forum/viewtopic.php?t=9463) where brett talked about enabling flags to do lowpass filtering on sounds behind you and sounds in the distance, is this something I should look in to?

Should I look at some other API than FMOD?
Perhaps anyone have experience in creating auralization simulations and would like to share some wisdom.

// snorr

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[quote="snorr":topo3th3]Okay, first of all I am a beginner at acoustics theory and FMOD, so my questions may perhaps seem ‘dumb’. Sorry for that… oh yeah, and please excuse my poor English as well ๐Ÿ˜›

I am about to develop an application where the goal is to simulate sound propagation in a 3d landscape in a realistic way. I will use different mathematical models to calculate the sound pressure level at different locations, and control the final volume on different sounds according to these models.
But the volume of the sound is not the only thing that needs to be realistic. Basically I am wondering if FMOD has a good support for things such as sound occlusions (know there is an example of this, but would you say it is realistic?), doppler effect (once again, realistic?), other phenomenas that alter the frequency or character of the sound in some way.
I noticed a topic (http://52.88.2.202/forum/viewtopic.php?t=9463) where brett talked about enabling flags to do lowpass filtering on sounds behind you and sounds in the distance, is this something I should look in to?

Should I look at some other API than FMOD?
Perhaps anyone have experience in creating auralization simulations and would like to share some wisdom.

// snorr[/quote:topo3th3]

http://host-a.net/icuurd12b42/GMFMODSimpleDemo.zip

This demo covers Doppler, occlusion 3d relative though in linear fading, frequency shifting, DSPs (existing presets), wave and spectrum data fetching and most basic features used in a game (3d or 2d) that does not require in depth knowledge.

One little detail is that sounds are played exactly at the listener’s z level so when sounds pass over from left to right while in stereo 3d mode, you get an over exaggerated shift from left to right. My users report placing the listener a few units lower/higher than the sounds, you get proper fading.

Doppler is pretty accurate IMHO. So is the occlusion (which is set to use cubes in the demo)… But one user did complain that the sound did not echo through, say, a hallway. That is, the sound did not bounce on walls; it may be the way I simplified the use of the api.

Tiny note on the demo. The call to set listener position is not at the right spot in the game loop, causing a slight artefact while fully occluded.

You can add sounds in the map by clicking mouse while in edit mode (space key)

The last map (n to switch) is empty so you can gingerly try a few things.

If you are quick enough, you might be able to tack on a music file to a moving car, giving the effect of someone driving with his stereo too loud. Pretty funny.

The rest of the FMOD features not in the demo may prove useful to accomplish exactly what you want. Skim over the FMOD API. If you know what you are doing, you can figure the right method to achieve your goals (if achievable).

My knowledge of such system is very limited, yet look at what I accomplished.

Cheers.

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Thanks for the reply! Will look in to your demo and check out the doppler and occlusion effects.

Cheers

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