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Hey guys,

is there a way a theme would stop after the music is played to the end?

What i’d like to do is when default music is playing I want to play a short "oneshot" music (not concurrent, but sequenced) and forget about it.

Is that possible?

Thx!

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so basically we need:

play cue A
play cue B
after cue B is done, automaticlly go back to cue A

how to do this?

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create 2 cues. ‘cue A’ and ‘cue B’

click the (+) symbol on both to connect a theme to each of them. Now click the spanner on one of those themes; this will take you to the theme editor. Drag a sound file into each theme, these are called segments.

Now create a link from ‘segment A’ to ‘segment B’. This will make segment B automatically go to segment A when it finishes. Next create a link from segment A to itself, this will make segment A constantly loop.

So start cue A and it will loop. When you want to play segment B start cue B, when it finishes it will automatically go back to playing segment A.

Hope this helps.

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PeterStirling, thanks.

The problem with your solution is that it works only with A and B.

Let’s say I have A and B that are loopable. Now I want to play C, which plays only once.

After C is finished, it will simply go to the theme that is first on the segment link. Not the one that was playing before I started C.

If there is no simple solution, is there a way a programmer would find out when music is finished and we’ll work out from there?

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[quote="jocorok":h0efhnhp]Hey guys,

is there a way a theme would stop after the music is played to the end?

What i’d like to do is when default music is playing I want to play a short "oneshot" music (not concurrent, but sequenced) and forget about it.

Is that possible?

Thx![/quote:h0efhnhp]

Sounds like you want the programmer to use a ‘prompt’ for the theme and not a cue. You can simulate this by turning off the ‘sticky mode’ in the audition panel cue properties.

Prompt will create the cue, then turn itself off. Used with a stop segment, I think you’ll get the behaviour you want.

cheers,
Templar

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[quote="Templar":2lj642zr]Sounds like you want the programmer to use a ‘prompt’ for the theme and not a cue.[/quote:2lj642zr]

Not sure if I follow you… Can you explain it a bit more?
thx

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[quote="vesoljc":3vh30pr0][quote="Templar":3vh30pr0]Sounds like you want the programmer to use a ‘prompt’ for the theme and not a cue.[/quote:3vh30pr0]

Not sure if I follow you… Can you explain it a bit more?
thx[/quote:3vh30pr0]

Sure, basically within the music system API there are 2 ways for a programmer to request music.

  • ‘PrepareCue’ (where the cue must be started and explicitly ended).
  • A ‘PromptCue’ (which starts a cue then automatically ends it)

Prompts were generally designed to operate with ‘one-shot’ style flourishes. The programmer can ‘prompt’ a flourish and forget about the cue. There is nothing stopping you using this with a sequenced theme to get the behaviour you are after (described in your first post).

Of course this all occurs at the programmer level, and requires the programmer to make the appropriate prepare or prompt call.

The sound designer can test the affects of a prompt or prepare call using the audition console. Simply drag a cue into the audition console. By default the button will behave as a ‘prepare’ call (the cue must be explicitly started AND stopped). By entering the button’s properties, you can turn off ‘sticky mode’. Now the button will behave like a prompt (the button starts the cue and immediately switches of).

I’d suggest experimenting with the ‘sticky’ mode behaviour. You should see how it affects the theme stack (the theme currently playing and transitions to other themes).

NOTE: the ‘sticky’ mode button is for auditioning only! It does not change anything in the .fev or .fsb…it just lets you hear what happens if the programmer uses a cue or prompt call.

I hope this makes it a bit clearer.

cheers,
Templar

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thanks, will try it!

one more: is it possible from the programmers side to "see" what is playing?

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Hey. Thanks for taking time to explain.

It’s still a bit mistery…

I play theme A (by starting cue A)
then I prompt cue B (which I thought would "one-shot" play theme B, since it’s attached to that cue ),
but it just restarts theme A.

One thing that I was looking at is crossfade or queued transitions between themes. This would probbably also solve our problem if I could choose this method of transition on every link between the segments, or depending on what was playing before. Choosing default transition on a theme isn’t useful since it depends on what was playing before.

Thanks,
Rok

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[quote="jocorok":3u79yivk]Hey. Thanks for taking time to explain.

It’s still a bit mistery…

I play theme A (by starting cue A)
then I prompt cue B (which I thought would "one-shot" play theme B, since it’s attached to that cue ),
but it just restarts theme A.

One thing that I was looking at is crossfade or queued transitions between themes. This would probbably also solve our problem if I could choose this method of transition on every link between the segments, or depending on what was playing before. Choosing default transition on a theme isn’t useful since it depends on what was playing before.

Thanks,
Rok[/quote:3u79yivk]

Yes, ‘queued’ default transitions are the way to go. I made an example .fdp file to demonstrate…only to find that Designer has a bug using prompts and queued default transitions. This will be fixed shortly.

If you are interested in a slightly different .fdp example (a method which will work now, using crossfaded transitions and shared timelines) send me a PM with an email address.

cheers,
Templar

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